Communicating EFNs media panel

Communicating EFNs media panel

Facilitator: Corinne Jackson
Corinne JacksonCorinne is responsible for getting the word out about Okanagan water issues and the activities of the OBWB, and is the staff lead on the Okanagan WaterWise communication strategy. Corinne is uniquely suited for this role – with an education in political science, and work experience as an award-winning journalist, having covered numerous beats, including social justice issues. Corinne left journalism in 2001 to pursue a career in communications while continuing to feed her passion for social issues. In her off-hours, she loves to catch up on the news and all things political, play and explore with her two kids and husband, and hone her xeriscape gardening skills!

 

Teresa Marshall

Teresa Marshall specializes in using creative media to connect local issues and broader movements for change.

Her professional career includes her work as a television journalist, filmmaker, and campaign and communications strategist for human rights and environmental issues. Her award-winning documentaries include Pocket Desert: Confessions of a Snakekiller, selected for the NFB’s Why We Fight Back collection.

Together with Syilx leader Pauline Terbasket, Teresa co-founded the Columbia River Watershed Storytelling Project bringing together settler and First Nations neighbours in ‘community water circles.’ Teresa serves as chair of Caravan Farm Theatre and as a board member of of IndigenEYEZ.

 

John McDonaldJohn McDonald is a long-time reporter, photographer and columnist from the Central Okanagan.

He has written extensively about municipal issues, including the irrigation districts and water utilities that serve Kelowna.

After 16 years in print, John made the jump to online media in 2009. Most recently he was a reporter for InfoNews.com.

 

Barry Gerding is the senior regional reporter for Black Press in the Okanagan.

Barry Gerding

Barry’s career as a journalist in the B.C. community newspaper field spans 37 years working in northwest B.C., Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island and the Okanagan.

He was managing editor of the Kelowna Capital News for 16 years from 2000 to 2016, and prior to that was editor of the Burnaby Now, Chilliwack Times and Ladysmith Chemainus Chronicle. He also worked as a reporter for Houston Today, Interior News in Smithers, Sidney Review on Vancouver Island and Abbotsford Times. He currently works and lives in Kelowna, is married with two kids and far too many animals.

Flow Regatta October 19

NASH FLOW REGATTA, Q BATTLE, & PUB CRAWL – October 19, 2018

Calling all worker rogues and vagabonds! Here is your chance to unfetter yourself from your desk chains and learn some new field techniques such as RISC compliant Salt Dilution, non-contact Image Velocimetry with your phone, as well as tried and true ADV. Bring your own devices to compete! Prizes and Clan honour to be won. Lunch and free spirits abound!

Friday, October 19, 2018 9:00am – 3:30pm
Fee $40 – includes lunch & refreshments.
Mission Creek, Kelowna, B.C. Meet at KLO Road.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER NOW!


Download Poster (PDF)

 

Our Facilitators

We are thrilled to announce our facilitators:

Kelly Terbasket

Program Director of IndigenEYEZ, a holistic approach to strengthening four essential relationships: with self, with others, with nature, and with culture. IndigenEYEZ encourages communites to explore their own cultures and to think deeply about what traditional values mean in the contemporary world.

Aaron Noel Derickson

Educator, Facilitator, Consultant, Youth Mentor. Aaron is currently pursuing his Ph.D at UBC Okanagan in Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies. His research entails Leadership and Governance from a Syilx perspective, based on Ceptiklw (oral legends).

Kathy Porter

Chair of the Collaborative Global Initiative, Climate Change Mediator and regenerative designer in B.C.

 

…MUCH more than their titles suggest, we encourage you to check out their bios here.

 

Determining Environmental Flow Needs (EFNs) have long been a source of conflict, trying to parcel out what is needed for human vs. environmental needs for water. For two days, we will be focusing on this conflict and using a truly collaborative process to meet the challenge. Together, our facilitators offer a unique approach – both in content as well as in format – integrating Syilx traditions and traditional knowledge, and the dialogue process (i.e. less presentation, more conversation!).

For more on the conference – including the full program, registration details and more, please browse this site: www.EFN2018.ca.

Special thanks to our conference organizing partners: Okanagan Nation Alliance, B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development, UBC Okanagan, BC First Nations Fisheries Council, WWF-Canada, and POLIS Water Sustainability Project.

We look forward to seeing you!

Background:

Environmental Flow Needs (EFNs), or the volume and timing of water required to ensure effective functioning of an aquatic ecosystem – for fish and other needs – is an important but still evolving science. In locations where significant demand or competition for water exists, such as the Okanagan, scientists, policy-makers, planners, and regulators are now focussed on developing methods to determine appropriate EFNs. In B.C., the introduction of the Water Sustainability Act in February 2016 requires that EFNs (or in-stream flow needs) be determined for water bodies potentially affected by any new proposed licences for surface or groundwater extractions. This requirement creates opportunities and challenges for water management and the need for better EFN science and collaborative dialogue among all water users to reconcile their needs and interests.

With this conference, we are thrilled to bring together representatives from national and international organizations engaged in water management or research, including fisheries and water managers, First Nations, regulators, policy-makers, academia, and NGOs. The event will cover several main themes and focus on the current state of EFN-setting in B.C. and recent EFN-related work in the Okanagan and elsewhere in Canada and the U.S.

Group Accommodation Details

The Coast Capri Hotel is holding 100 rooms for October 16 and 17, and 75 rooms for October 18.

Group Block Details:

Group Number: CCH-GFC22862
Group Name: Okanagan Water Basin Board Environmental Flow Conference
Arrival Date: October 16 2018
Departure Date: October 19 2018
Method of Reservation: Call In On Own
Reservation Deadline: September 16 2018
Method of Payment: Pay On Own
Individual Cancellation: 48 Hours from the Date of Arrival

Guest Room Accommodations/Group Rates:

Guestrooms:
$130.00 Single occupancy

Additional Person(s) $ 20.00 Per person(s), per night, plus taxes. Children 18 years and under stay free when sharing a room with a paid adult.

Rate Details:
Rates are net, non-commissionable and are exclusive of taxes (currently 16%)

Individual Reservations:
Delegates, please contact either Central Reservations Office at 1.800.663.1144 or the Hotel Direct at 1.250.860.6060 and quote the Group Name or Group Number as noted above.

 

The Coast Capri Hotel
1171 Harvey Avenue, Kelowna BC V1Y 6E8
coastcaprihotel.com

Sponsors & Organizing Partners

We are excited to announce our sponsors and organizing partners:

GOLD SPONSORS:

Okanagan Basin Water Board

B.C. Ministry of Environment

Anonymous

UBC Okanagan | Earth, Environmental & Geographic Sciences

Okanagan Nation Alliance

Pacific Salmon Foundation

Real Estate Foundation of BC

SILVER SPONSORS:

Hoskin Scientific

Associated Environmental Consultants Inc.

BC Oil & Gas Commission

Kerr Wood Leidal Consulting Engineers

BC Hydro

City of Kelowna

BRONZE SPONSORS:

Ecoscape Environmental

Ecofish Research

Thank you for your support!

Thank you to our sponsors

 

ORGANIZING PARTNERS:

Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB)

Canadian Water Resources Association, B.C. Branch (CWRA-BC)

Okanagan Nation Alliance (ONA)

UBC-Okanagan (UBC-O)

First Nations Fisheries Council of British Columbia (FNFCBC)

POLIS Project on Ecological Governance (POLIS)

World Wildlife Fund (WWF)

B.C. Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations & Rural Development (FLNRORD)

 

Organizing Partners

 

Seeking Sponsors

EFN2018 is seeking your sponsorship.

This is an excellent opportunity for your organization to showcase your services, products or professionals.

Your primary audience will be individuals and organizations interested in Environmental Flow Needs and the management of our shared water.

The conference will include plenary sessions, a gala banquet, and exhibitor hall with many great networking opportunities.

Up to 275 water resource professionals from Canada and abroad are expected to attend.

Download the EFN 2018 Sponsorship Package

Gold Sponsors represent a premium financial commitment to this conference and will have the opportunity to have a large logo displayed at all of the various events and meals as well as have a representative say a few words to the delegation during the Gala dinner. Gold sponsors will have the opportunity to set-up a display at the conference.

Silver Sponsors represent a significant financial commitment to this conference and will have the opportunity to have a medium logo displayed at all of the various events and meals. Silver sponsors will have the opportunity to set-up a display at the conference.

Bronze Sponsors will have the opportunity to have their organization’s name displayed on conference promotional materials.

FOR MORE INFORMATION or for questions regarding exhibitor options or sponsorship, please contact sponsorship co-chairs: Nelson Jatel at (250) 469.6295, e-mail nelson.jatel@obwb.ca or Lawrence Bird at (250) 545.3672, e-mail birdl@ae.ca.

Further Reading

Visit  obwb.ca/efn to learn more about the Environmental Flow Needs Project, including:

Mission Creek Habitat and Intake Mapping

Collaborative Development of Methods to Set Environmental Flow Needs in Okanagan Streams
This report presents the results of a study to develop robust methods for determining the Environmental Flow Needs of Okanagan streams, and provide information needed to customize the methods for 19 specific tributaries within the Okanagan Basin.

Annotated Bibliography – Environmental Flows: Water Use Plans and Technical Documents in the British Columbia Context
This Annotated Bibliography centralizes information of interest to the Okanagan Water Stewardship Council’s Environmental Flows committee. Specifically, included are Water Use Plans and Technical documents that are in the Okanagan Basin context.

obwb.ca/efn

Welcome!

The Okanagan Basin Water Board and the Canadian Water Resources Association, BC Branch are hosting an Environmental Flow Needs Conference, October 16 to 18, 2018, in Kelowna, British Columbia.

Environmental Flow Needs: Science, Policy & Practice

This conference builds on a workshop held in Vancouver in January 2016. The conference is intended to bring together researchers, fisheries and water managers, regulators, and policy-makers from a range of organizations (e.g. academia, First Nations, other governments, non-profit water organizations, and consultants) to discuss the state of knowledge of EFN-setting in B.C., to showcase recent EFN work in the Okanagan and elsewhere in B.C. and Canada, to address challenges in implementing B.C.’s new Water Sustainability Act, and to develop recommendations to improve the process of EFN setting, policy-making, and regulation related to EFNs.

More details to follow.

What Are Environmental Flow Needs?

The environmental (or in-stream) flow needs of a stream are defined as the volume and timing of water flow required for effective functioning of the aquatic ecosystem – for fish and other needs.

Methods of determining EFNs have been in use in North America for several decades, but in many areas no information on EFNs is available.

In B.C. the introduction of the Water Sustainability Act in February 2016 created a need to determine EFNs for water bodies potentially affected by proposed surface or groundwater extractions.

In locations where significant demand or competition for water exists, such as the Okanagan, scientists, policy-makers, planners, and regulators are now focussed on developing methods to determine appropriate EFN flow regimes.

These efforts are also being driven by an ever- increasing demand for water, and growing frequency and severity of droughts.